Real Talk: CFPs and Stepping up the AAR and SBL Pre-Game

As I've written before, so much of academic life is trying to figure out how people fit into the boxes we use to make sense of our worlds. Knowing some of the politics and frustrations that entails, I've tried to use this website to open that process up a bit. And I appreciated sharing about that in some different venues.

REL 101 (WCH): Signifying Religion: An African American Worldview

What if the study of religion started with the African American experience? Instead of privileging a specific tradition, this course examines the history of a people who came to a new world compelled to quickly learn the significance of "religion" itself. We will follow along by plumbing the depths of the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade, listening to … Continue reading REL 101 (WCH): Signifying Religion: An African American Worldview

#EtownEngage: #FergusonSyllabus Teach-In

LancasterOnline's Tim Stuhldreher spoke to my colleagues and I about what the #FergusonSyllabus looks like at Elizabethtown College. Check out his article, "College events look at Post-Ferguson, Race, Justice Questions." Click here to get a recap of my teach-in courses, and visit the college's Storify for more on the campus-wide conversation. Richard Newton, PhD is curator of Sowing the Seed and Assistant … Continue reading #EtownEngage: #FergusonSyllabus Teach-In

Teaching Religion 101 –The Old School and the New School

On August 29, 2014, members of the Society of Biblical Literature and the American Academy of Religion shared tweets on what they had been taught as students and what they are teaching now as professors. Thanks to everybody who was a part of it. And a special thanks to the Forum for Theological Exploration, Seminarium, and the … Continue reading Teaching Religion 101 –The Old School and the New School

Devices Equal Bad Note-Taking? It’s not that simple!

But we cannot forget that the default mode for schooling (from Early Childhood to HigherEd) is pen and paper...When we talk digital note-taking and other electronic engagement, we must consider that most students--let alone, teachers-- are picking up skills on the fly.