Reading “The African American Bible” on Paper and in Class

The Journal of Biblical Literature recently published a series on ways that biblical scholars have engaged with #BlackLivesMatter in their work. Adele Reinhartz, the journal's general editor, introduces the essays in this way: In this Forum, six scholars reflect on how racial violence and the movements that attempt to eradicate such violence intersect with the field of biblical studies, both … Continue reading Reading “The African American Bible” on Paper and in Class

Blessings:Reprise–Chance the Rapper, Religion, and the Senses

Students in Dr. Richard Newton's Signifying Religion: An African American Worldview course were invited to employ tools and theories from religious studies to explore how meaning making works. Miriam Balasundram took a phenomenological approach to consider religion and the senses. She was taken by the rhythms of Chance the Rapper and reflected on what led her to … Continue reading Blessings:Reprise–Chance the Rapper, Religion, and the Senses

Christian Support for the Black Lives Matter Campaign

Hannah Ciocco examines Black Lives Matter’s recent overtures among Christian communities, drawing parallels to the role of religion in the Civil Rights Movement. Ciocco draws upon the work of Broadcast Seeding guest, Drew G.I. Hart for insight on the role of religion in social activism and engagement.   “Every 28 hours, a black person is murdered … Continue reading Christian Support for the Black Lives Matter Campaign

A Passionate Education?: The Creation of Boko Haram

Sam Epps explores the formation of Boko Haram and the lesser publicized effects it has had on Nigeria. See also Garrett Clark’s work on the aesthetics of Boko Haram’s violence. Both Elizabethtown College students are working with Dr. Richard Newton to document Boko Haram's violence in Nigeria and to analyze the discourse around its mediation.    Nigeria is a coastal country … Continue reading A Passionate Education?: The Creation of Boko Haram

Boko Haram and the Aesthetics of Violence

Garrett Clark considers the overlapping sensory experiences represented by Boko Haram’s flags, arguing that this synesthesia facilitates deep psychological violence. See other posts in our series Words to live by: the ethics of grammar, Millennials and persuasion, scriptures in public school, and sexual rhetoric in the Hebrew Bible. Boko Haram deserted Damasak, the northern city … Continue reading Boko Haram and the Aesthetics of Violence