Reading “The African American Bible” on Paper and in Class

The Journal of Biblical Literature recently published a series on ways that biblical scholars have engaged with #BlackLivesMatter in their work. Adele Reinhartz, the journal's general editor, introduces the essays in this way: In this Forum, six scholars reflect on how racial violence and the movements that attempt to eradicate such violence intersect with the field of biblical studies, both … Continue reading Reading “The African American Bible” on Paper and in Class

“Better Know a Religion Blog” and “The State of the Study of Religion”

  Looking to add some substantial religious studies scholarship to your blog diet? The North American Association for the Study of Religion has you covered with their fantastic new series, "Better Know a Religion Blog." This has been a great way for us to keep track of what our colleagues are doing in the field. Last … Continue reading “Better Know a Religion Blog” and “The State of the Study of Religion”

The Bible and Race in the USA: What Went Without Saying

Curator's Note--I've struggled for weeks with how to conclude the Bible and Race in the USA series. People's shock at the malleability of truth and the temptation of exceptionalism has challenged me to re-situate the discussion. So before you is a personal reflection to explore why so few of our current events are actually textbook. … Continue reading The Bible and Race in the USA: What Went Without Saying

Incarcerated in the “Land of the Free”

After the recent LA Times mea culpa regarding two published letters rationalizing Japanese-American internment, we take a concerted effort at examining an aspect of WWII history that is often overlooked: religion. Marlee Schwalm (Elizabethtown College '18) surfaced a struggle between Shinto and Christianity in the Pacific conflict. Written before the LA Times imbroglio, her piece is a … Continue reading Incarcerated in the “Land of the Free”