Real Talk: Should I be Proposing Conference Paper(s)

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Real Talk is our new professional development series. We discuss the things that'll make you a better teacher-scholar. If you have a question or want to share your own thoughts, message our curator. Dear Professor Newton, The Call for Papers is out for the American Academy of Religion and the Society of Biblical Literature annual meetings. … Continue reading Real Talk: Should I be Proposing Conference Paper(s)

“Better Know a Religion Blog” and “The State of the Study of Religion”

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  Looking to add some substantial religious studies scholarship to your blog diet? The North American Association for the Study of Religion has you covered with their fantastic new series, "Better Know a Religion Blog." This has been a great way for us to keep track of what our colleagues are doing in the field. Last … Continue reading “Better Know a Religion Blog” and “The State of the Study of Religion”

What Went Without Saying

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Curator's Note--I've struggled for weeks with how to conclude the Bible and Race in the USA series. People's shock at the malleability of truth and the temptation of exceptionalism has challenged me to re-situate the discussion. So before you is a personal reflection to explore why so few of our current events are actually textbook. … Continue reading What Went Without Saying

Locations of Interpretation: Scriptures and Fear in America

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Ekaputra Tupamahu discusses Marlee Schwalm's foray into the history of religion in the American Pacific WWII theater. He surfaces resonances between Post-Pearl Harbor Japanophobia and Post-9/11 Islamophobia. This is the fifth issue in our fourth volume on the Bible and Race. Read a response to this piece here. And see our first, second, and third volumes here. I find Marlee Schwalm’s essay on the Japanese … Continue reading Locations of Interpretation: Scriptures and Fear in America

Reimagining America as Liminal: Continuing to Travel with MC Jin

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Ekaputra Tupamahu reframes Maya Aphornsuvan's study of Chinese-American hip hop artist MC Jin in terms of hybridity and liminality in the imagined community of America. This is the third issue in our fourth volume on the Bible and Race. See our first, second, and third volumes here. Maya Aphornsuvan’s essay reflecting on the life of Jin Au-Yeung … Continue reading Reimagining America as Liminal: Continuing to Travel with MC Jin