The Bible and Rap

Maya Aphornsuvan (Elizabethtown College '18) follows the story of rapper, MC Jin, examining how the Bible and race color the meaning of his success--whether he wants it to or not. This is the second issue in our fourth volume on the Bible and Race in the USA. You can read a response to this post here. “If … Continue reading The Bible and Rap

The Bible and Race in the USA: the Redundancy of Identity Politics

Hilary Clinton’s failed presidential campaign has prompted a number of post-mortem pieces on the state of the Democratic Party. Not too long ago, pundits had predicted that Donald Trump’s nativism spelled the end of the Grand Ole Party. Now the question is where did Hilary Clinton go wrong,

Pentecostalism’s Rise through Hispanic Americans

Amanda Robbins challenges us to think through the appeal of Pentecostalism within a Hispanic American context. She wonders how the needs of communities register in Bible-reading strategies. See other pieces in our series on the Bible and Race here. Pentecostalism has been an increasingly popular religion in the United States of America, particularly for its … Continue reading Pentecostalism’s Rise through Hispanic Americans

The Bible and Race in the USA: Dating Human Worth

For many Christians, the season of Advent is a time to reevaluate what is worthwhile in the world. The idea is that at season's end, the birth of Christ brings a new formulation of life's fundamentals. Jesus didn't come to abolish the law  but to fulfill it (Matthew 5:17). The gospel becomes an accounting of who and … Continue reading The Bible and Race in the USA: Dating Human Worth

Thoughts on the State of our Disunion

Today, we can speak casually of the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960’s. Many of us are not required to think about, really think about, the effects of three hundred-plus years of “writing on backs” that lead to the movement. We are removed from the economic realities and social injustices that lit the fire for that movement. Anyone who has not had to come to terms with the persistence of that writing on the backs is not likely to feel the sense of urgency that racism in this country ought to stir in all of us.