#SyrRelBodies: US Religions and the Regulation of Bodies of Color

Learn more about Dr. Goodwin's amazing class here and follow the hashtag #SyrRelBodies on Twitter for a well-curated discussion of US religions and the regulation of bodies of color. 1. Tell us about #SyrRelBodies. Describe the project. #SyrRelBodies is the hashtag for “Black+Blue,” my honors course on American religion and the regulation of bodies of … Continue reading #SyrRelBodies: US Religions and the Regulation of Bodies of Color

Strife with Uighurs Fueled by the Mandate of Heaven?

Contrary to public debates on social difference, many conflicts happen at the crux of multiple cultural discourses. In this piece, Samantha Mundorff theorizes about the conflict around the Chinese Muslim population known as the Uighurs. She theorizes how ancient Chinese political philosophy may inform the contemporary state’s policy on the minority group. Xinjiang is a … Continue reading Strife with Uighurs Fueled by the Mandate of Heaven?

A Passionate Education?: The Creation of Boko Haram

Sam Epps explores the formation of Boko Haram and the lesser publicized effects it has had on Nigeria. See also Garrett Clark’s work on the aesthetics of Boko Haram’s violence. Both Elizabethtown College students are working with Dr. Richard Newton to document Boko Haram's violence in Nigeria and to analyze the discourse around its mediation.    Nigeria is a coastal country … Continue reading A Passionate Education?: The Creation of Boko Haram

Boko Haram and the Aesthetics of Violence

Garrett Clark considers the overlapping sensory experiences represented by Boko Haram’s flags, arguing that this synesthesia facilitates deep psychological violence. See other posts in our series Words to live by: the ethics of grammar, Millennials and persuasion, scriptures in public school, and sexual rhetoric in the Hebrew Bible. Boko Haram deserted Damasak, the northern city … Continue reading Boko Haram and the Aesthetics of Violence

Going through the Emotions: Islamic Calligraphy in a Public School

Richard Newton began our series, “Words to Mean By,” with a look at the inner workings of truth-making. Our next installment is a case study in the seemingly volatile nature of a text deemed “religious.” In the example below, parents at an American public high school balk at the secular study of Islamic calligraphy because the … Continue reading Going through the Emotions: Islamic Calligraphy in a Public School