Con Los Ojos De La Maya: An Interpretation of the Parable of the Sower

Maya Poster

header1.jpgDuring my master’s program, I did an independent study on the Parable of the Sower and its rich reception history. Though scholarly interpretations vary among historical, literary, and social-scientific critics, all camps agree that the story makes for a poignant commentary on the human condition. The theological promise offered by the Kingdom of God calls attention to problems faced by those interested in a better life on Earth. But while the text enables one to enjoy dominion over a difficult circumstances, it equally facilitates the subordination of those who stand apart from the reader.

Put simply, one person’s hope for Heaven can become another person’s Hell realized. I observed expressions of these power dynamics in an ethnographic study of a Modern Yucatec Maya community and my historical study of agriculture in the Early Roman Levant. Primary ethnographic and archaeological research took place between 2006 and 2008. This ancient/modern comparison aims to inform those interested in culture, religion, and scriptures. Preliminary versions of this study were presented at Northaven United Methodist Church, the North Texas Conference UMC Project Transformation, Moody Memorial United Methodist Church, and Southern Methodist University’s Perkins School of Theology.

Special thanks to the following research institutions for sharing their intellectual resources:

They welcomed me as a dig volunteer during their Summer 2007 season, generously showing me the tools of the trade and entertaining my many questions.
welcomed me as a dig volunteer during their summer 2007 season, generously showing me the tools of the trade and entertaining my many questions.
MRP introduced me to  anthropology and brought no small amount of encouragement in my studies. I attended and worked at the ethnographic field school in Yaxunah on multiple occasions and served as a research assistant while a student at Texas Christian University.
MRP introduced me to anthropology and brought no small amount of encouragement in my studies. I attended and worked at the ethnographic field school in Yaxunah on multiple occasions and served as a research assistant while a student at Texas Christian University.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Special thanks to the following organizations for their financial sponsorship:

This Biblical Archaeological Society offers scholarships of $1,000 every year to a few people who would otherwise not be able to volunteer.
This Biblical Archaeological Society offers scholarships of $1,000 every year to a few people who would otherwise not be able to volunteer.
The Fund for Theological Education's Ministry Fellowship is a $5,000 award for seminary students in the first year of a Master of Divinity program. The Ministry Fellowship seeks to bring together a community of emerging, young pastoral leaders from an array of communities and backgrounds across the Christian spectrum. These remarkable young leaders represent voices that cut across lines of race, gender, ethnicity, ability, sexual orientation, denomination and ideology to form a leadership cohort dedicated to a life of service to the church and the world. Fellows use the awards to design and execute a project to enrich their communities.
The Fund for Theological Education’s Ministry Fellowship is a $5,000 award for seminary students in the first year of a Master of Divinity program. The Ministry Fellowship seeks to bring together a community of emerging, young pastoral leaders from an array of communities and backgrounds across the Christian spectrum. These remarkable young leaders represent voices that cut across lines of race, gender, ethnicity, ability, sexual orientation, denomination and ideology to form a leadership cohort dedicated to a life of service to the church and the world. Fellows use the awards to design and execute a project to enrich their communities.
 The John Hicks Fellowship was established in memory of Professor John Hicks, former teacher of the Old Testament at Perkins School of Theology. The fellowship is offered to support research in the broad area of biblical studies and is especially designed to provide travel to the Bible lands to aid in that research.
The John Hicks Fellowship was established in memory of Professor John Hicks, former teacher of the Old Testament at Perkins School of Theology. The fellowship is offered to support research in the broad area of biblical studies and is especially designed to provide travel to the Bible lands to aid in that research.